Wise Words From Popdogg Elliott; Celebrating 30 Years Of Sobriety

The coolest O.G. I know.

The coolest O.G. I know.

 Shane

 Your new blog is fantastic!  I don't know if you know that I traveled the same road you did, only    quite some time ago.  I will be celebrating 30 years of sobriety next January 5th!  There is a process all alcoholics go thru before they seek help.  There is a period of denial, sometimes quite lengthy, in which they fool themselves into thinking they are OK and won't succumb to their sickness.  And then, almost magically, they get beyond the fogginess and the numbness and, as if by rote and as if in concert with all the other alcoholics who have preceded them, they manage to speak three little words:  I need help.  And those three little words mark the beginning of a mighty transformation leading to essentially a brand new life.  No longer will our addiction hurt the ones we love, or shorten our lives, or take our lives.  And you get down on your knees, and you thank you higher power for the gift you have been given, and the tears you shed are tears of pure joy. Congrats, my friend.  It looks like you have found your purpose.  (Incidentally, one of my favorite Pot Luck songs:  "What's Your Purpose".)

 Love you.    Popdogg

 

 Popdogg,

Your truthful words of wisdom mean a whole lot to me. You are a good man, and I want to say what an amazing thing it is that your about to celebrate 30 years of sobriety. Sometimes I think we as men have everything we need and want right in front of our faces, but without God in our lives we are blinded by the obvious. I feel lucky enough to have found a different path when I did, but I must stay conscious of the fact that the alcoholic thoughts may never go away.
Just curious, after 30 years of sobriety, do you still have these thoughts? I hope all is going well with you and Mrs. Elliot, I would love to stop by sometime soon and say hello. Much love to the both of you and thank you so very much for the support. 

Shane

 

Shane,

 In answer to your question regarding the urge to try alcohol again:  The day I left the
 treatment center I was apprehensive about whether or not I had the strength to 
 maintain my sobriety in the real world with its many temptations.  But there was something
 which quickly came to mind which the center had taught me.  One of the videos we were
 shown indicated that alcohol was a poison.  Of all the many sessions, the AA meetings,
 the one on one talks, that idea became fixed in my mind.  Alcohol, for alcoholics like me,
 IS poison.  And, of course, why would I want to stand in front of an approaching train-- or
hold a gun to my head--or put poison in my body?  So my mantra quickly became:
ALCOHOL IS POISON, ALCOHOL IS POISON, ALCOHOL IS POISON!!  To this day, on occasion, the thought crosses my mind, and I am grateful that, because it does my sobriety journey continues.


Drop by one of these times.  I've written a new song I'd like to run by you.
Take care of yourself, my friend.

 Popdogg